30 Attractive purple perennial (With Picture) for Your Garden

Planting purple perennial flowers is an ingenious choice to enliven your green garden, you deserve a pat at the back.

The color is an eye-catcher perked up by perennial's resilience to come back without replanting, your landscape is a sure visual treat for gardeners and everyone else.

Many people admire purple and so do I. Despite seeing different possible flower pigments, the color is truly one of the prettiest and most majestic. In fact, purple represents dignity, pride, and abundance.

The violet flowers will stand out in your garden, add interest in your house or add beauty in your bouquet.

There is actually no stopping for purple efflorescence to be the center of attraction in your most arrangements.

purple perennial flower identification: 30+ Attractive Purple Perennial Flowers

Put together the serenity of blue and the fiery intensity of red. you'll get the rich tone of violet that will boost your garden's royal drama.

To help you identify what perennial variety producing purple blooms , here is more than 30 of the most attractive purple perennials to add a bit of dazzle in your garden.

1: Allium (Ornamental Onion)

Allium

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun to partial shade
  • Watering- Regular to occasional
  • Soil condition- Acidic, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring, early summer
  • Special feature- Drought, cold, deer tolerant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- zone 4-10

Allium is a genus of ornamental onions. Many assume that onion and garlic families are not good for garden designs but there are several cultivars of Allium that do.

Generally, Alliums grow round bloom heads (pom-pom like) composed of dozens of star-shaped flowers.

The leaves smell like their close relative spices but they are not edible. It will improve less to none of your dishes if you mistakenly use it. They are usually green, long and strapped and mostly native to the Northern Hemisphere.

How To Care Allium

Alliums prefer slightly acidic soil around 5.5 to 6.5 that has good drainage. They are prone to rot if left in damp soil for too long.

They only need regular watering during the flowering stage but once established, it will be a low maintenance perennial. 

In fact, it is both drought-resistant and cold-tolerant Additionally, they are not easily bothered by animals that will try to ruin your garden. It is very tough yet Alliums will appreciate fertilizing the soil but it isn't necessary, though.

The genus has many varieties, one is Globemaster (Allium 'Globemaster') a hybrid cultivar with spherical, lavender-colored flower heads. The foliage comes with strap-shaped, green leaves that can reach 1.5-2.5 feet tall.

Depending on the kind chosen, the mature heights of species differ. Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon) is quite tall reaching 3 feet in height. The purple blooms are in a unique egg shape in the top of a green, narrow stalk

Another cultivar worthy to mention is Purple Sensation (Allium hollandicum). It has globes of intense, purple flowers usually 3 inches wide.

It is one of the alliums in your garden with the richest color and thus recognized Royal Horticultural Society as the recipient of Award of Garden Merit.

Hardy geraniums benefit greatly in regular pruning and being fed by slow-release fertilizers. They will also live longer if constantly divided every 3-5 years

It will establish better if done before frost when extreme cold isn't helpful in their medium growth rate.

2: Perennial Geranium (Geranium bohemicum)

Perennial Geranium

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun to partial shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Neutral to slightly acidic,
  • Bloom time- Spring, summer, fall
  • Special feature- Deer and rabbit resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Division
  • USDA hardiness- zone 3-9

Geraniums look similar to their cousin Pelargonium but perennial geraniums are true of the kind and are native to North America.

The relatives look almost identical but a close inspection can differentiate geraniums to have slender stems and well-proportioned flowers. 

More often, true geraniums are pointed out as ‘Cranesbill Geraniums' since their seed pods appear like the bill of a crane bird.

How To care Perennial Geranium

Most cranesbills are low growing reaching several inches tall but depending on the variety, some reach up to 8 feet.

The plants can thrive in partial/full shade locations but won't blossom flowers as many as the ones exposed to more sun. 

However, those under the direct sun will require regular watering contradicting its low maintenance fame. Geraniums grown in shady areas will only be watered when the topsoil gets dry. Overwatering will harm the plants and make them more vulnerable to diseases.

Geranium ‘Rozanne' is a variety of small purple perennial flowers. It has lilac flowers against the deep green foliage. The plant can grow 12-20 inches in height and spreads to 18-23 inches.

It blooms from early summer to fall and may repeat bloom throughout its growing season. Rozanne will grow on average soil type and acidity and are hardy in zones 5-8.

Another cultivar of the true geranium genus is Geranium ‘Ann Folkard' that blooms cupped flowers of purple-red tint.

These are purple perennial trailing flowers that bloom and re-blooms during summer when they fully flourish. It can grow from 1-2 feet and hardy in zones 5-9.

Ann Folkard attracts butterflies but not deer. It is one of the germanium species that do better under shade than full sun.

3: Blazing Stars (Liatris spicata)

Blazing Stars

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun to partial sun
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Neutral to slightly acidic, drains good, average fertility
  • Bloom time- Summer, fall
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division, Liatris corms
  • USDA hardiness- zone 3-10

LiatrisSpicata or Blazing Stars are native perennials of North America. The plant is also famous to be called Gayfeather or Prairie Star. Being a true meadow indigent, it can withstand extreme heat and drought.

It can also thrive on tough soils but will flourish more in slightly acidic and with mediocre fertility soil.

However, all of the soil requirements are only the next priorities after having soil with good drainage. Stagnant water is fatal to the plant that can cause winter wet.

The plant can grow from 3-6 feet but its other variety Dotted Blazing Star (Liatrispunctata) grows 1-2 feet only. Hence, the variety produces grass-like foliage with purple spikes.

Unconventional to other plants, the delicate purple wands grow from top to bottom against the common bottom to top.

Liatris genus members are sun lovers but still survive in locations with partial sun. Like its natural habitat, water that amounts similar to rainfall in the field is enough for it to establish.

Rough gayfeather (Liatrisaspera) also add lavender to purple vertical interest to summer gardens. It has tufted blossoms growing in its stems forming tubular spikes that pollinators find attractive. It grows to a height of 18 inches making it a good cut flower.

4: Phlox (Phlox Paniculata)

(Phlox paniculata)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part sun, shade
  • Watering- Regular to occasional
  • Soil condition- Average conditions, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring, summer
  • Special feature- Attracts birds and butterflies; Deer and mildew resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- zone 3-9

Phlox which means flames from the Greek terminology is a genus of more than 60 species. They are tall purple flowing perennials that display colorful flowers that you can use as a ground cover or beautiful backdrop. 

They are easy to grow and mostly has average to fast growth rate. Phlox are native to North America and considered very popular in American gardens.

Phlox comes in two forms: the upright Garden Phlox and the low growers Creeping Phlox.

Both plants are stunning additions to gardens and some varieties are even sweetly fragrant. One example of creeping phlox is Sherwood Purple Creeping Phlox.

Like the name implies, this creeper sports violet-purple flowers swaying on 8-inch stems above a carpet of evergreen foliage.

It is a tall purple perennials has good speed when it comes to growth and the matured phlox reaches 3-6 inches tall. It crawls horizontally twice as its height.

Perennial phlox 'Jeana' is a purple perennial flower belonging to Garden phlox. It is characterized by upright stems with dark green leaves and the flowers are composed of a cluster of small lavender inflorescences.

They grow 2-4 feet tall and can be grown as a single specimen or mass planted.

Most members of the genus enjoy full sun and shade, they are only to be watered when rainfall isn't enough to keep the soil moist. It must have good drainage since stagnant water in the soil can rot the roots.

5: Lupine (Lupinus Polyphyllus)

Lupinus polyphyllus

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part sun
  • Watering- Regular
  • Soil condition- Neutral to very acidic, good drainage
  • Bloom time- Spring, summer
  • Special feature- Attracts birds and butterflies
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds
  • USDA hardiness- zone 3-7

Lupine [ loo-pin ] derived from the Latin which means wolves are thought to be the ferocious plant in its natural habitat.

It was believed that lupine flowers drink all of the nutrients from the soil and is not friendly to other neighboring plants.

They prefer full sun but afternoon shades are welcome too. However, the more it is not exposed to the sun, the less purple spikes of flowers it will produce.

The Russell Hybrid Series is the cultivar most famous to the gardeners. The plants in the series can soar 2-3 feet making it ideal as a beautiful interest in the garden.

They have a long life provided it has good soil conditions. Damp soils with slight fertility have a better chance of propagating. This is especially true during hot summers.

6: Wild Indigo (Baptisia Australis)

Blue False Indigo

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun
  • Watering- Weekly to occasional
  • Soil condition- Average
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant and long-lived
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cutting
  • USDA Hardiness- Zone 5-8

Wild Indigo (baptisiaspp) is an herbaceous perennial of 10 species. Depending on the variety, it produces multicolored flower spikes that bloom usually during spring.

Aside from the pretty shoots, baptisias are loved by many gardeners for its dense foliage. After it flowers, the plant transforms into round shrubs that very well follow pruning.

The plant is popular for its eye-catching blooms in colors white, blue, yellow, or purple. A species called Baptisia 'Purple Smoke' is a hybrid of Baptisia varieties resulting in charcoal stemmed with smoky purple blossoms.

It appears similar to Lupines but this indigo is drought-tolerant purple perennials.

It can thrive in full sun to part shade although wild indigos, in general, perform better on garden receiving at least 6 hours of full sun.

Another variety of tall purple perennial flowers is Baptisia x varicolor 'Twilite'. They are tougher in the sense that they do not only withstand long dry spells but salt sprays, deer and rabbits too.

These are upright reaching 3-4 feet tall. The long stem has blue-green foliage.

Wild Indigo matures in quite a height and width so it is better to plan it carefully in garden locations. They are slow-growers but notes for its long life span.

7: ‎spiked speedwell (Veronica spicata)

Spiked Speedwell (Veronica)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, partial shade
  • Watering- Weekly to occasional
  • Soil condition- Neutral to acidic, fairly moist, has good drainage
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Attracts birds and butterflies; Drought, deer and rabbit resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-8

Commonly called Speedwells, they are native to Europe and the county flower of Montgomeryshire. Veronica is an herbaceous perennial consisting of 500 species in its genus.

The plant produces flowering spikes of different colors. Speedwells tend to be pest-resistant except for common issues like powdery mildew, spider mites, and thrips.

Veronica Atomic Violet Ray is one of its species showing off vibrant flowers of purplish-blue. They flourish without problems in zones 4-8.

The elegant spikes are perfect perennial borders since it only grows 12-14 inches in height. Sitting in the garden, it attracts butterflies in average garden soil.

Another variety with purple flowers is Royal Candles Veronica. Fit for its name, the perennial has grand spikes growing to a maximum of 20 inches tall. This kind of Veronica attracts both butterflies and hummingbirds.

Veronica Eveline is also part of the genus producing deep purple spikes. It has deep green foliage and like other Veronica species, is tough to deer. It reaches 16-20 inches tall once it matures.

Veronicas are fairly easy to grow since they are wildflowers in nature that can easily adapt to a garden environment.

8: Aster (genus)

Aster

8: Asters

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, partial shade
  • Watering- Frequent during summer to seldom
  • Soil condition- Moist, organically rich, has good drainage
  • Bloom time- Late summer to early fall
  • Special feature- Attracts birds and butterflies
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-8

Save the best for last...season. Perennial Asters are the garden late blooming purple perennial showing beautiful flowers at the end of the season. These plants are the usual last nectar providers for monarch butterflies and other pollinators.

Asters are native to North America, Europe, and Asia, the two main kinds are the New England and New York. The two look similar being short in stature varieties but have taller kinds available.

A cultivar of the first kind is Purple Dome New England Aster that has violet blooms similar to daisies in appearance.

This plant grows compact of about 16 inches tall and 18 inches wide with each violet blossoms ranging 1-2 inches.

New England asters have thick stems and hairy foliage that fully develops in late summer lasting for several weeks, enough to keep the garden in color after most plants have flowered.

Wood's Purple Aster is a New York cultivar that has thinner stems and smooth leaves. The plant has showy flowers of purple flowers and a vibrant yellow in the center.

The aster is known to be disease resistant but a good feeder to pollinators. It grows 12-18" tall of the same width.

Frikart's Aster Monchis another type of aster that bloom purple flowers. Compared to other cultivars, this perennial flowering plants is one of the earliest-blooming asters.

It attracts butterflies and bees but known to be difficult to deer. This is winter hardy to zone 5.

Most asters perform well in full sun but can tolerate afternoon shades. It can flourish on the soil of average condition as long as it is not overly wet or too dry- roots rot if kept on too moist soil or it may lead to wilting if planted on dry sandy soil.

9: Bee Balm (Monarda Didyma)

9: Bee Balm (Monarda Didyma)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, partial shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Average to rich, has good drainage
  • Bloom time- Late summer to early fall
  • Special feature- Attracts birds and butterflies; drought-tolerant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

Bee balm is a member of the mint family, so, understandably, the majority assume they are edible.

While most parts are and it is also used medicinally as healing salves But the drawback of being under mint family is inheriting its runner-like traits, meaning if left to grow on it is known, the plant can be invasive.

It will gradually take over any space available. However, bee balms are known to have large amounts of nectars too so it will attract other butterflies and other pollinators too.

It has many varieties, Monarda species are very good contributors of its medicinal fame, Wild bergamot (Monardafistulosa) is one. You can easily recognize its flower with a rugged appearance against green herbaceous, aromatic foliage.

Monarda is a purple perennial flower that can stand full or partial sun in a medium to dry soil types. It can grow up to 4 feet and it can highlight your borders with its soft, lovely appearance.

Purple Bergamot (Monarda media), is another kind under the Monarda array. It has lance-shaped leaves and square stems with its flower in purplish-red tone.

The color is bright against its green backdrop making it stand out much more if mass planted. It has an aroma reminiscent of the bergamot orange smelling fresh and citrusy.

Among the Monardas that have a little aggressiveness in its growing habit, Eastern bee balm (Monardabradburiana) is gentler and has a slower spreading speed.

Like other bee balms, it has a good amount of nectar but has a better reputation because of its deer and mildew resistance, plus shorter height suitable for landscapes.

It has aromatic leaves of gray-green color and slightly rough in the edges topped by light purple flowers.

10: Perennial Verbena (Glandularia bipinnatifida)

Perennial Verbena

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, partial shade
  • Watering- Occasional
  • Soil condition- Average, has good drainage
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 5-9

Herb of the holywort, Holy Herb, Herb of the Cross, Devil's Bane, Verbena has different names all connected to its biblical belief that Verbena or Vervain flowers are used to staunch Jesus' bleeding when He is laid down from the cross.

It symbolizes healing and protection from healing. In Egypt, it is called 'tears of Isis', in connection to the fertility goddess.

The first perennial verbena is the upright Vervain called Rigid Verbena. This cultivar has toothed, deciduous leaves with tubular flowers.

It attracts butterflies and songbirds but hesitant to deer. The plant is a spreader and makes a gorgeous border in the sunniest and driest part of the garden.

One more upright verbena bearing purple perennial flower is Purple top Vervain erecting to 5-6 feet in height.

The purple flowers sit on top of green, lance-shaped leaves and stems. This type of verbena is also fragrant and the flowers are rich in nectar.

A trailing verbena is Greystone Daphne. It is a beautiful perennial ground cover that shows off purple blooms usually a five-petal inflorescence.

The verbena reaches a short height of 6-8 inches tall. The perennial grows in clumps attracting beneficial insects.

Regardless of the species, Verbenas are sun lovers that can tolerate high temperature. It isn't important what type of soil it is planted as long as it drains completely well.

11: Iris (Iris Germanica)

Iris (Iris Germanica)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part sun
  • Watering- Regular without overwatering
  • Soil condition- Any type, neutral to slightly acidic,has good drainage
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, divisions
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 5-9

Iris (Iris germanica) has an interesting story from which it is derived. If you like Greek mythology, you probably know Iris.

The goddess of the rainbow and the messenger of the Olympian gods. The perennial displaying assorted colors were named after her. The genus has more than 300 species.

The most popular Iris are the tall purple-flowering perennial. They were 'bearded' with fine hairs, an example is Feed Back Tall Bearded Iris.

It displays deep violet blooms and strong sturdy stems. They are beautiful attractions outdoors with butterflies feasting around. Feed back Iris is solid rebloomers first in summer and again in the fall.

Siberian Iris is a relative of I.germanica but touted to be easier to grow. It is a purple perennial flower that shows off delicate flowers in grass-like foliage, a definite interest in borders and corners.

The plant can reach 2-4 feet tall with each bloom producing at least 20 stems of flowers.

Aside from the two kinds of Iris, Japanese Iris is equally beautiful blooming purple inflorescences. It has wide petals making it look flat purple butterfly in the sea of green foliage.

Similar to other Iris, this flower is very adaptable in its growing environment. The only care it especially has is it is a heavy feeder.

12: Hydrangea (Hydrangea Macrophylla)

12: Hydrangea (Hydrangea Macrophylla)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part sun
  • Watering- Weekly
  • Soil condition- Rich, drains well
  • Bloom time- Summer, spring
  • Special feature- Blooming colors can be controlled by soil ph
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Divisions
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

A truly irresistible perennial in bloom, hydrangea has a unique feature of making some of its blooms change color depending on the soil's alkaline or acid level.

Most hydrangeas sport flowers in round clump form looking like snowballs but in different colors than white. One kind of hydrangea is the French hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla).

Hydrangea macrophylla Color Fantasy or the Deep purple hydrangea is a good sample of French species. It produces shiny, green leaves with a cluster of deep purple flowers. It is a purple flowering perennial that blooms all summer it is perfect for a small garden since this plant only reaches 3 feet in maximum height.

One kind of hydrangea that can gorgeously exhibit its unique characteristic is Hydrangea macrophylla 'Cityline Mars'. It has purple inflorescence in soil with neutral pH.

You can play its hue between blue and pink by adding peat moss or limestones. Lower soil ph will make it blue and raising it can make it pink. You can even be playful so it will bloom multiple colors in one season.

13: Lavender

Lavender

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun
  • Watering- Weekly to Regular
  • Soil condition- Sandy, alkaline, drains well
  • Bloom time- Late spring, early summer
  • Special feature-Attracts birds and butterflies; deer and rabbit resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Yes
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 5-9

There is no denying that lavender is one of the most popular bush type perennial bearing lilac-purple blooms.

The blue-green foliage and the alluring spikes emit a distinct scent that can be smelled even flowers were dried. It is a genus where most members share the same appearance and hue.

One cultivar is the Royal Velvet English Lavender that has deep purple shoots and also has heavy fragrance. This scent attracts the good pollinators keeping the garden happy for years.

Grosso Lavender is another kind perennial plant with dark purple shoots. The species is widely used in fragrance making.

It is suitable for mass plantings too because it has a beautiful display of blooms forming from violet leaves.

Enjoy this up close,Silver Anouk Spanish Lavender is a two-tone lavender having silver foliage with purple spikes. Each stem spikes is topped with a lighter shade of purple floret which appears like wings of a small butterfly.

If you may, another lavender with deep purple spikes is Lavance Deep Purple English Lavender. It is a drought-tolerant type and a good addition to a small garden or indoor containers.

A note though, lavender are short-lived herbaceous perennial no matter how perfect its growing environment may be. It will last 10 years, not short actually.

14: Fameflower (Phemeranthus Calycinus)

14: Fameflower (Phemeranthus Calycinus)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun
  • Watering- Weekly to Regular
  • Soil condition- Average but prefers Sandy and Rocky soil that drains well
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 5-9

Native to North America, fameflower is a warm climate lover. You will love going home in the afternoon when the flowers are open because it typically blooms during mid-day showing off violet flowers with a hint of rosy hue. The flower tops its leafless stem extending 8 inches in height.

Fameflowers drought tolerant purple perennial, you can plant it in the warmest part of your garden and yet it will thrive.

But during cooler weather should you plan its transplanting when it becomes dormant. It can tolerate most conditions aside when its roots are disturbed during division.

15: Bellflower (Campanula)

15: Bellflower (Campanula)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Regular to occasional
  • Soil condition- Fertile, drains well
  • Bloom time- Late spring to early fall
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant; Attracts beneficial insects
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

The name says it all. Bellflower or Campanula is a hardy perennial that blooms bell-shaped flowers commonly in shades of blue and purple. Depending on the variety, the cold-hardy plant can grow to the range of 1-6 feet.

They are a dazzling addition to indoors or outdoors plant arrays like colorful bells in the green field. Bellflowers can bring color to the garden when most flower bloomers have finished.

Korean Bellflower is a cultivar of bellflower displaying royal purple bells. The flowers hang upside down, long-growing in clusters.

The blooms stand out against green backdrop and have a mild fragrance to keep its area smelling great throughout the season.

If you will consider popularity, Peach-Leaved Bells is the kind of bellflower that will top the list. In contrast to its name, it is a lavender-colored blooms producer. The species attract pollinators that can naturally spread its seeds.

A bellflower with a very slight chance of growing out of bounds is Adriatic Bellflower. They have a rapid growth rate enough to colonize empty areas outdoors.

The flowers are a small cluster of light purple blooms and the leaves are dark green with toothed edges.

A variety of bellflowers with purple flowers but takes a long time to bloom is Carpathian Bellflower.​

It does not bloom into clusters, but there is elegance once the flower flourished. It looks stunning wherever you keep it as long as it is not harmed by direct sun.

16: Balloon Flowers (Platycodon grandiflorus)

16: Balloon Flowers

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Regular
  • Soil condition- Fertile, slightly acidic, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies and birds
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-8

Kids love popping this! Balloon flowers bloom from buds swelling up like a mini hot air balloon in the garden.

When popped, this perennial opens to a large, star-shaped flower. They are a close relative of bellflowers which explains why the blooms look similar. In the garden, many applaud the easy growing care.

Fuji Blue is a type of balloon flowers with a name game. Despite being called blue, the flower is in the shade of purple.

The purple perennial flower has a great resemblance to the flower of its relative looking like a saucer. The flower blooms throughout the summer adding colors in your garden beds and borders.

An exclusive purple treat, Apoyama Misato Purple has a deeper purple tone compared to other varieties. It is a dwarf type of balloon flower and blooms later in the spring.

A bonus type is Komachi. Among all other balloon flowers, this is the only cultivar that doesn't leave the balloon stage.

A matured Komachi stays in the golf-ball appearance together with the popping sound it produces whenever pressed.

17: Anise Hyssop (Agastache foeniculum)

Anise Hyssop

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Regular to occasional
  • Soil condition- Fertile, neutral, drains well
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies and birds; deer and drought-resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-10

Member of the mint family, Anise hyssop (AgastacheFoeniculum) is neither an anise seed (Pimpinellaanisum) nor hyssop (Hyssopusofficinalis). It is edible though and can be used in salads or infused in teas.

The tender perennial has a green stem, veinous leaves and fuzzy spikes from blue, red, pink, orange and purple.

The herb has the fragrance attracting the good garden insects, smelling like mint or licorice when fresh or dried.

Anise hyssops usually grow 2-4 feet high. But the variety Little After Hyssop is short, growing 15-18 inches tall only.

While its height is shorter from other varieties, it is well backed by its blooming frequency that can be usually more than one. The herb shows purple spikes on top of its green, bushy foliage.

Korean mint is a type of A. Foeniculum that grows unusually tall. It can reach 3-4 feet in height thus being called the Purple giant hyssop.

The gentle hyssop is a low-maintenance plant suitable for cottage gardens. You can even see this in the Meadows and herb gardens.

18: catmint (nepta)

18: Catmint (Nepeta)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full Sun, Half Sun / Half Shade
  • Watering- Frequent to occasional
  • Soil condition- Humus-rich, drains well
  • Bloom time- Late spring, summer
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies and birds; deer and drought-resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-8

An easy grower perennial, catmint is part of the mint family. The plant belongs to Nepeta genus all of which have mild fragrance attracting birds, bees and butterflies.

It has gray-green foliage and spikes of mostly lavender hues. Most nepeta has a trailing habit making it the perfect plants for edges.

Catmints are usually deer resistant and drought tolerant. The usual height of Nepatas is 10-24 inches but the giant cultivar reaches 24-36 inches tall.

This is Catmint ‘Six Hills Giant' that grows in clumps of deep purple flower shoots. The flowers bloom in early summer and re-blooms sporadically throughout their season.

An interesting variety is 'Walker's Low' Catmint that has been recognized by the Perennial Plant Association as the 2007 Perennial Plant of the Year.

It has lavender-blue inflorescence in top of soft, green foliage. It is easy to grow with almost none pest problems.

19: Violas

Violas/Pansies

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full Sun, Half Shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Fertilized, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies and birds; deer-resistant
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 8-11

Violas or pansies are under the Violacea genus where handsome heart-shaped petals of flowers brighten up spring gardens.

Pansies bloom aromatic flowers in diverse colors and are a good treat for butterflies, bees, and birds. It is called "heart's ease" from an interesting fact that blossoms are believed to cure heartbreak.

The perennial has been the state flower of Illinois, New Jersey, Wisconsin, and Rhode Island.

Pansies are great perennial ground covers and Columbine Violet is one variety fit as well in containers and small space gardens.

It only grows 6-10 inches tall bu are fast growers. It takes only a few months to a year before it can take over the empty spaces of the garden. It is not ill to look at because instead, you'll witness the sea of purple.

Most violas flourish in full sun but Halo Violet, a variety that prefers shady areas and locations with cooler temperatures.

The sweet-smelling ground cover despite loving indirect sun can tolerate some heat. Among the cultivars, Halo violet produces flowers with a darker shade of purple.

All violas are herbaceous, they die after they blossoms only to come back in the next year. They are deer resistant flowers and are known to be heavy bloomers.

20: Lungwort (Pulmonaria)

Lungwort

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Part shade, full shade
  • Watering- Seldom
  • Soil condition- Fertilized, neutral to alkaline, moist, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Attracts butterflies, bees and birds
  • Pruning- Yes
  • Propagation- Division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-8

Odd name for a plant, isn't it? The name lungwort originated from the old belief that plants resembling body parts will might as well cure it.

The perennial has a diseased lung appearance so it was thought to cure respiratory problems, thus the name.

However, the plant is now popularized with its delicate flowers in almost silver-looking foliage. And it is one of the early spring bloomers enjoying the shady corners of your garden.

'Benediction' lungwort is one variety sporting deep purple-blue flowers. Its leaves are speckled with silver dots making it look purple flowers amidst silverish foliage. The plant can grow up to 10 inches, suitable for containers.

Another variety with purple blossoms is 'Excalibur' lungwort, the flowers have magenta tone making it look more vibrant and noticeable.

This plant has silver leaves, veined and edged with emerald green. It has good tolerance to mildew and is evergreen to regions with mild winter.

21: Wolf's Bane (Aconitum napellus)

Wolf's Bane (Aconitum Napellus)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full Sun, Half Sun / Half Shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Average, Moist / Wet, Well Draining
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Deer and rabbit resistant
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

Part of the Aconitum genus of over 250 species, Wolfsbane is also known as monkshood and queen of poison. It got its name from being a toxic plant from roots to top.

Nevertheless, it is an herbaceous perennial deserving a spot in your garden since the plant blooms tall and erect displaying bold colors of flowers. It has deep green foliage that can rise up to 4 feet.

Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii' is a purple perennial flower under the genus known to bloom later than its other species.

Because of its delayed bloom, it has been called autumn-flowering monkshood. It shows off deep purple flowers against dark green leaves and in ideal conditions can grow more than 4 feet.

The most common variety of Aconitum is Aconitum napellus. It is tall wolfsbane that can reach a height of 5 feet.

It has a beautiful purple hue of oblong flowers like Monk's hood and with lobed leaves. It is one flower used even in Ancient times when its toxicity is used on tips of arrowheads.

Regardless of the variety, extreme care is imposed on using this plant especially in as medicinal aid.

22: Larkspur (Delphinium)

Larkspur (Delphinium)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full Sun, part shade
  • Watering- Regular
  • Soil condition- Slightly alkaline, humus-rich, moist, well-draining
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; resistant to deer and rabbits.
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-7

The cool shades of Delphinium are its main attraction to gardeners. But it should be noted that the bold spires of this perennial with its green foliage and fern-like leaves has a stunning height of up to 6 feet. Because of its extent, the plant is more effective at the back of borders.

Known to be a purple perennial flower called Hybrid Bee Delphinium. This a garden attention-seeker because the dense, deep purple flowers are very well complemented by its white center.

The stems are sturdy too and do not need staking. It can grow as much as 4-5 feet, blooming the entire summer to early fall.

Black Knight Delphinium is another cultivar but requires staking since it can reach up to 6 feet.

Dark purple flowers stem from woody foliage and sharply incised leaves. Like most Delphinium, you can plant them in back rows of flower beds and still catch your interest.

Delphinium 'Pagan Purples' has probably the darkest violet flowers of the family. It is emphasized more by its brownish center, being double-flowered and the tall height.

The distinct feature of the genus is their cut leaves and Pagan purple also exhibits this. The flower not in bloom is still beautiful because of this leaves. It may rebloom if spent flowers are cut in its season.

23: purple betony (Stachys officinali)

Betony

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full Sun, part shade
  • Watering- Frequent
  • Soil condition- Slightly acidic, moist, well-draining
  • Bloom time- Summer, spring
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds;
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4

Magical herb- Egyptians believe that betony has special powers to drive away spirits. It was even worn as an amulet by people of middle ages for protection against evil.

While Romans thinks highly of this plant as a medicinal herb that can cure 47 illnesses and restores the energy of injured wildlife.

Betony (Stachysofficinalis) bloom inflorescences ranging from white to deep purple and the stem is green with slender toothed leaves.

It has an unusual flowering style, top of stems produce a spike of small flowers and while others thought its done flowering, it will burst another group of flowers a few inches down from the initial batch.

Stachysofficinalis 'Hummelo’ is a cultivar of betony with rose-lavender flowers. The purple perennial flower has glossy leaves that are mostly evergreen in regions with warm winter.

24: Purple Brocade Ajuga

Purple Brocade Ajuga

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Part shade, full shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Humus-rich, moist, well-draining
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division, cuttings
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-8

This perennial is a member of the Ajuga genus with the common name of carpetweed. By its playful name, you can already imagine that this one is a creeper.

Purple brocade spreads three times its height of 8 inches. Given the right conditions of soil and sunlight, this can get a little too aggressive.

During its blooming season, it shows off indigo spikes among glossy green-burgundy leaves. It is dense pretty much like a carpet in the garden and is great for rock gardens.

The attractiveness of the perennial when planted in mass can as well attract nectar-sucking insects.

Another Ajuga member sporting purple flowers is Black Scallop Ajuga. It has black-burgundy leaves and the flowers have a slight blue tone with the majority of purple. It grows 4-6 inches tall with a fast growth rate.

We are aware that ground cover plants are supposed to grow short, but Chocolate chip Ajuga has interesting dwarfism reaching 3 inches only.

Still, it blossoms purplish-blue spikes amidst oval, glossy leaves in the chocolate shade. It is very low maintenance and can thrive in shady places.

25: Spotted Dead Nettle (Ghost Lamium)

25: Spotted Dead Nettle (Ghost Lamium)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Part shade, full shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Free-draining, moist, any soil ph
  • Bloom time- Spring, summer
  • Special feature- Drought-tolerant, deer resistant, pollution tolerant; attracts butterflies
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-8

Not like ghosts you can or cannot see,Ghost Lamium can easily be spotted with orchid-purple flowers on top of silver leaves edged by a green outline.

This perennial flower reaches 10 inches in height spreading 24 inches. Using it as a ground cover or border edges can give the gardener the satisfaction of growing a striking plant in low maintenance.

Another Lamium cultivar known to be a purple perennial flower is the Purple Dragon Lamium.

This plant has bigger flowers compared to other varieties producing a cluster of bright purple inflorescences. The variety is evergreen and can be easily grown in containers and as a garden mat.

26: Salvia Divinorum

Salvia Divinorum

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Occasional
  • Soil condition- Moist, drains good
  • Bloom time- Spring, fall
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; Drought-tolerant
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 5-9

Salvias consist of more than 1000 species, all members of the mint family. They have mildly fragrant foliage and the flower spikes standout in the shades of mostly purple-blue.

But there are red, pink and whites too and rarely it has yellow. All of which have square stems and lance-shaped leaves.

Most perennial salvia loves the sun but the plant is forgiving to partial shades too. It is native to Europe and Asia and a few varieties from Western America.

Winning the Perennial of the Year way back 1997, May Night Salvia is still one of the most famous perennials nowadays.

It produces showy spikes in deep purple on top of green-gray foliage. This plant is hardy in zones 4-8 reaching 24 inches when matures.

Meadow Sage is tagged as one of the easiest to grow perennial. It is drought-tolerant, deer-resistant and has extended the blooming period, no doubt several gardeners include this in their sunny nursery.

27: Ironweed (Vernonia fasciculata)

Vernonia fasciculata

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Moist, rich, drains good
  • Bloom time- Summer
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; drought-tolerant
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-8

Tough and unyielding like iron, this plant truly deserves its name. Ironweed has a rigid habit and rusty seed cluster making it look like the steel.

Most members of the family bloom purple flowers growing 4-6 feet tall announcing its presence on moist borders like pool area or streams and ponds.

A variety with remarkable height is New York Ironweed, it erects upright to 8-10 feet. Deep purple flowers and finely toothed leaves are the main attraction of this plant appearing every mid-summer to mid-fall.

Another type is the Iron Butterfly sporting cluster of tiny, intense purple florets above the finely textured foliage.

They are low mounding ironweed reaching 2-3 feet. They are a beautiful accent to a cottage and rain garden

Ironweeds are a natural magnet of friendly pollinators but can be bitter to deer. They can grow to be a spreader if not controlled by regular deadheading.

28: Leather Flower (Clematis)

Leather Flower (Clematis)

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Often
  • Soil condition- Fertile, well-draining
  • Bloom time- Late spring, early summer
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, cuttings, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 4-9

If not the most, maybe one of the top list of most beautiful blooms in the flower kingdom. Clematis has a spectacular profusion of blooms in different colors making it the 'Queen of Vines'. The perennial trails growing on trees or walls and can be added as a long-blooming cut flower.

Clematis has delicate stems and is prone to be tangled if on neglect. However, it can't do so since it is highly maintained- especially the water needs. All efforts are paid when it starts to bloom and emit fresh fragrance.

One type of Clematis common among gardeners is the President's Clematis. Actually, most people regard the plant features similar to this variety.

It has deep purple blooms with a very luxurious vibe. It is a rebloomer when the second flowering in autumn.

Clematis ‘Jackmanii' is a native of England. It has the innate trait of Clematis of climbing up a trellis.

The very deep purple flowers are well emphasized above Woody stems and green leaves bed. The purple perennial flower spreads to 3-4 feet.

As a vine, Clematis twines, but it has the shrubby property of growing upright. Small-Flowered Shrub Clematis can reach 34-38 inches tall.

The purplish-blue blooms dangle like bells from late spring to summer. It is hardy to zones 3-8.

29: Coneflower

29: Coneflower

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, part shade
  • Watering- Regular
  • Soil condition- Average to medium moisture, well-draining
  • Bloom time- Summer, fall
  • Special feature- Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; drought-tolerant
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds, division
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

Coneflowers are tough perennial herb native to East of America. Also known as Echinacea, the plant produces daisy-like flowers in a wide range of bright colors.

Coneflowers grow upright from 2 to 4 feet in height in dark green foliage. They are fast growers requiring minimal care whether grown indoors or in the garden.

A coneflower variety with purple flowers is Echinacea pallida. They are also Pale Purple Coneflower which explains its petal having light hue.

This variety has a big center and droopy petals, the plant reaches 3 feet in height, hardy in zones 3-10.

Another cultivar with purple highlights is Purple Coneflower. Obvious to its name, the flower-petals are purple around the thick, round center. It is suitable for large containers even as a single specimen reaching 3 feet in height.

Regardless of variety, coneflowers can stand full sun to partial shade even when sun intensity is extremely high. It is drought-tolerant and regular watering must only be between dry spells.

30: Hyacinth

30: Hyacinth

Quick facts:

  • Exposure- Full sun, light shade
  • Watering- Moderate
  • Soil condition- Neutral to slightly acidic, loamy, drains well
  • Bloom time- Spring
  • Special feature- Attracts, butterflies
  • Pruning-- Yes
  • Propagation- Seeds
  • USDA hardiness- Zones 3-9

Hyacinth is one of the most fragrant flowering perennials you can have in your spring garden. They don't grow high, only about 1 foot tall, but can be the highlight because of lush colors.

They are tubular with clusters of small flowers. They are ideal for pathway decor, patio or even rock garden. Their short stature is also perfect for mass plantings or flower beds.

Miss Saigon Hyacinth is a purple booming perennial of the family. It has highly fragrant, star-shaped petals and bright leaves. It flourishes for several weeks blooming in the spring.

Another purple bloomer is Purple Sensation that has rich majestic inflorescences with white highlights.

Splendid Cornelia is another type of Hyacinth but with flowers in light purple shade. It has lance-shaped green leaves and the plant is like other hyacinths have a fresh aroma.

A smart tip for Hyacinth planters, in time of bloom, transfer your plant indoors for a natural air freshener.

On Purple Perennial Flowers

There you have it. Purple perennial flowers have a long list and though this is a lengthy post it isn't close to enumerating all perennials that bloom the royal color.

I hope this will brighten up your mind and see the ability of purple to stand out in your green blanket.

Go on, try planting some and you'll not regret it.

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